Tag Archives: New York Headshots

What to wear for a headshot session (and what not to)

What do I wear for my headshots?

What should you wear for your headshots?

The question I get asked most is, without a doubt, “What should I wear for my headshot session?” or “How do I pick an outfit for my headshot?”  There are two answers to this question– a general answer and a specific answer.  The general answer is that you should wear an outfit to your headshot shoot that you would wear to an audition– you want to look like a person, not an “actor.”  That means no black turtlenecks, and you don’t need to dress up in a business suit unless you plan on playing a businessman (or businesswoman!).  The actress pictured to the right is frequently ‘typed’ as a cop or lawyer and wanted a headshot that showed that without hitting the nail on the head, so we chose a fitted leather jacket.  Before you start pulling outfits from your closet it’s best to first identify your type .  Check out my blog post on how to figure out your actor type.

Now on to the specifics:

  • Once you’ve identified your “type” bring an outfit that best represents it.  Look at how your “type” is represented in different mediums.  What does your competition wear in commercials, on procedurals, in movies?  There are slight variations for every type. Bring a casual option and a more formal option.
  • Don’t bring clothes with loud patterns or designs.  Avoid writing and logos.  That isn’t to say you should be boring– colors and designs are okay, especially for commercial shots, just make sure that what you’re wearing doesn’t distract from you.  The viewer’s eye should be drawn to your face, not your t-shirt.
  • Bring at least one option that matches your eye color.  This can make your eyes pop.
  • Focus on bringing a variety of necklines– this is all that will show in the majority of your shots.  Girls, avoid spaghetti straps as this can look like you’re in a victoria’s secret ad– unless that’s what you’re going for.
  • Avoid bulky or rumpled clothes.  No christmas sweaters and no wrinkled dress shirts.
  • Don’t worry so much about your pants!  Odds are slim we’ll ever see them.  Girls make sure you wear something comfortable and durable if you’re shooting with me because we’ll be moving around a lot.
  • If there’s one theme here it’s bring a bunch of options!  Even if you don’t end up shooting half of them it’s good to have them with you.
Picking an outfit for headshots

How do I pick an outfit for my headshots?

Those are some ground rules, now feel free to break them.  There are exceptions to every rule– what works for one actor may not work at all for another.  Some actors should absolutely wear solid colors and solid colors alone, but others really can work with patterns.  Even if it’s not something that ends up working for your primary headshot it could be perfect to round out your promotional shots on your webpage and imdb.  The same actress wanted to make sure she got a friendly, approachable shot so she brought her most comfortable plaid shirt as an option.  We didn’t spend a lot of time shooting it but in the shot to the left I think it ended up working out for her.

Lastly, if you have any more questions about what outfit to wear for headshots ask your photographer for advice!  I always have my clients send me a couple of pictures (preferably their old headshots that aren’t working for them) and give them personalized suggestions in our phone consultation.

Visit http:/www.kitpictures.com to find out more about me and my work!

Advertisements

Should I get my headshots retouched?

Another question I get all the time is “Should I have my headshots retouched?” or, alternately “How much should I have my headshots retouched?”

The short answer is yes.  It is now an industry standard for actor headshots to be retouched.  Your headshot will be compared to and judged against headshots that have digitally whitened teeth, smoothed over skin and brightened eyes.  That being said, casting directors have trained their eyes to notice excessive retouching by looking at thousands of pictures every day and have little to no patience for people who have turned their headshots into cartoon caricatures.

I chose this example because the original picture was problematic– the light wasn’t quite right and the subject’s hair was a mess. In the rest of the shoot the hair behaved but in this shot– which ended up being his commercial agent’s favorite– it had a mind of his own. The skin was also smoothed out slightly and the eyes brightened, but by and large the finished project looks like the subject in real life. And in case you were wondering, yes this is a self portrait!

A good rule of thumb is to make sure your headshot lines up with your own reflection.  Is that a photograph of you on your best day or a photograph of a stranger?  Don’t be afraid to ask your friends opinion.  The question to ask is not “Do I look good?” but “Does this picture look like me?

The follow up question, of course, is “Where should I get my headshots retouched?”  The answer to this question is often the same as the answer to “Where should I get my headshots printed?”  I generally refer my clients to Reproductions in New York City and Argentum Photo Lab in Los Angeles for both printing and retouching.  It’s very helpful to be able to look at a test print to see how the retouched photo looks on paper.

That being said, retouching at these photo labs can be on the pricey side and you can save money by going through an independent retoucher.  How much does retouching cost? That depends on the retoucher, but I’ve never heard of a legit retoucher charging more than $35 an image. Many photographers do their own retouching or work with a professional.  I have recently started working with Roman Faiman from 4-8 Designs. He did the all the retouching examples you see in this blog.

Above all don’t be afraid to voice your opinion to your retoucher. If they are making you look ten years younger– stop them! Explain that you want a natural picture that shows how you really look. You can’t go wrong if your headshot accurately represents what you look like when you walk into the casting office.

K.

Visit www.kitpictures.com to book a shoot with me today!

How much should I pay for headshots?

How much do headshots cost? How much SHOULD headshots cost? How much is too much for headshots and how much is not enough for headshots? Every actor has an opinion on the subject and odds are good their opinion is that you should pay however much they paid for theirs!

The real answer depends on where you live and what you’re looking for. Top photographers in New York can charge upwards of $1,100, more with hair and makeup included. Concurrently, you can walk into a photo studio in the mall and pay $50. With the former you will receive hundreds of professional pictures that look pulled from the pages of a fashion magazine. With the latter you will most likely walk away with one or two usable pictures that look pulled from the pages of a high school year book. I’m not saying that you can’t get by with a $50 headshot– if you shine through in the photograph then you shine through in the photograph. I’m also not saying you need to spend $1,100 on your headshot– a slick, expensive looking shot might not suit your type. It all boils down to what type of image you want to present.

Are you just dipping your toe in the water, looking to do background work and maybe submit on small parts on actorsaccess.com or backstage.com? Then a basic picture that shows what you look like with a plain background might serve you until you decide you want to take the plunge and make pursuing acting a major priority.

Do you look like Angelina Jolie? Have you just shot a great part in a studio feature and need a picture that says “I’m the next big thing?” Then expensive headshots might be a good investment for you.

Now what if neither of these scenarios apply to you? Then odds are goods that you are like the majority of serious actors. Both starting out and established, working actors need headshots and they need them once a year, on average. Every time your look changes dramatically you need new headshots. Oftentimes when you acquire or change representation you need new headshots. If you aren’t getting the results you want from mailings to agents and managers or submitting yourself for parts on actors access or backstage– you guessed it– you need new headshots.

Financially it just doesn’t make sense to spend that much money on your headshots every year– it’s not a good investment. That’s why many photographers, especially in Los Angeles, fall in between the two extremes. I currently charge $400 for a longer shoot and $200 for a shorter shoot, if you just need a few looks. Before I started my photography business, I went to photographers of every budget level and I can honestly say that I was most satisfied by mid-price photographers. It’s just my opinion, but I’ve found that good photographers start at around $150. I personally don’t believe in spending more than $600 on headshots. Anything past that and you’re not paying for the picture– you’re paying for the security of going with an established “name” photographer. That’s certainly worth something but I’m not personally willing to spend hundreds of dollars when I can secure the same piece of mind through properly researching and vetting a photographer before booking a session with them. I wouldn’t pay that much money as an actor and I wouldn’t charge that much money as a photographer. With a mid-price photographer you get quality without busting the bank and many of them offer quarterly specials if you keep your eyes out, especially during pilot season (wink wink).

There are, of course, no hard and fast rules when it comes to headshots. You could find great headshots for $100 in Idaho– or you could get useless pictures for $900 in NYC– but your odds of getting a good photographer and your odds of walking away feeling good about how much you spent increase dramatically when you do your research.

K.

Visit www.kitpictures.com to book a shoot with me today!